New Yorker: REVIVING THE POP-PUNK INNOCENCE OF BLINK-182

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The New Yorker‘s Amanda Petrusich wrote a cool piece regarding blink-182’s past and present, and how the band represents something inside ourselves that we can’t bear to let go.

Here’s a passage:

The grievances and pleasures Blink-182’s songs express—the dumbness of adults, how weird sex is, how cool jokes are, how lonesome life can be—are the kinds of things that get worried over most loudly from ages twelve to eighteen. It’s tempting to think that our emotions become more complex and multitudinous when we grow up. But most of us continue following those same early tracks, the ones we gouged in adolescence; the whole spectrum of human experience, all that longing and self-doubt, is perfectly sketched out in those formative years. That’s where pop-punk lives. Its rawness lies not in the music but in the heady newness of those feelings.

Read the full article here.

Posted on Posted in 182 Online, blink-182, California, Mark Hoppus, Matt Skiba, Tom DeLonge, Travis Barker

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